About the National Museum

About the National Museum

The new museum and the renewal of Oslo

Oslo’s waterfront is being transformed. The Opera House at Bjørvika has been received with enthusiasm nationally and internationally, and large residential areas and numerous ­office buildings are being constructed in its neighbourhood. In total, the building volume is equal to that of the city centre of a medium-sized Norwegian city.

 

The renewal started on the waterfront just thirty years ago. The closure of the Aker Shipyard enabled the creation of Aker Brygge, a new and traffic-free area near the City Hall. This new area is now being doubled in size with the addition of Tjuvholmen, where the Astrup Fearnley Museum will be the big attraction. This private contemporary art museum and the new National Arts Museum will complement each other, to the benefit of the visitor. 

The location of the new National Arts Museum will provide a clear boundary towards the square in front of the City Hall. The building will create an elegant transition between the new area of the city and the older city centre. It does not compete with the City Hall and respectfully bows to the historic buildings along the waterfront. The large building exudes a quiet dignity, reflecting the institution’s role in society.  

"Both the location and the building as such will make the visual arts more accessible. The Board of Directors wish that many more will be able to enjoy the exhibitions of the National Museum." Svein Aaser, Chairman of the Board